The TRUTH about the terms Longsword and Bastard sword

47 Comments

  • How did he pronounce Langschwert?

    Nero No. 1
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • I lold irl at the shirt commercial.

    Frank Brown
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • "French is weird"

    True, Shad. True.

    Lord Habitaxe of Prydonia
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • They call it a bastard sword because it turns regular kids into black kids…

    Martin Conta Gets Banned
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • The greatsword is damn tall

    Ahmad Ameen
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • I thought a bastard sword was bigger than a long sword

    SpaceRogue
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • Hold hold hold
    The longsword was rapier
    Rapier was side sword
    But isnt sidesword also called a Cutless? So what was their Cutless then?

    Dante Hixrabbit
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • So a D&D long sword is actually a bastard sword, got it easy enough, But is the D&D bastard sword actually a long sword, or is it still a bastard sword?

    Marcus21H
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • That's a real swordmans belly

    HockeyTown Luv
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • It's legal to open carry blades in the u.s

    Kalvin Chester
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • If I ever get motivated enough to make a fantasy RPG game I will have give you credit as where I get historical references lol

    Taber McFarlin
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • The problem is that in the medieval times, there wasn’t any industrial standard. Most weapons are custom made for a person or a group of people. An arming sword for a massive Viking can be a long sword for a small Italian. People probably pick up a weapon and fight in the style according to its size in relation to the wielder.

    Kenneth
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • For the bastard sword, I think it rather come from the nobles illegitimates children. Meaning that they're not entirely nobles but they're not quite commoners either, they're inbetween. Concerning bastard swords, they're forming a gap between one-handed swords and two-handed swords. So they're kind of both and neither at the same time.
    That's just the way I see it, I don't pretend to provide any scientific data.

    Deusdekis
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • Shad, i have noticed that when looking up dimensions of sword its always about the length. All fallus jokes aside. Where does one find more information about thickness of historicly accurate swords?

    Teisu Montgomery
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • Where I live it is legal to open carry any length “knife” as long as it is fully visible

    Chris L
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • French lesson: (who said I came way too late for that)
    Épée bâtarde
    The 2 é from "épée" sound like the first e from "epidemic", and the e from "épée" is silent
    And "bâtarde" sound like bastard but without the s in it. (If you have to use it for a "male" thing (yup french is weird, we put gender on things) it's the same but don't say the d of bâtard)

    rorp24
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • I never really knew about the warsword or arming sword classifications before I started watching you channel, so I would just use one handed sword, bastard sword, longsword, big longsword, greatsword.

    anon nimus
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • You can carry one in Texas.

    Jackson Ballew
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • no broad or short swords?

    Andrew Ron
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • wow an interesting content i found. i like swords.

    faith fath
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • The add in the begining was great

    Badas Unicorn
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • Where are your ultra greatswords?

    Mazaroth
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • Want to carry a sword in public? Move to Texas, last October we can now carry any melee weapon in public

    Bithor Gaming
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • MFW I realisce that in my country I actually could carry a longsword in a city :V

    Krzysztof Milański
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • If sword classification was (and is) so arbitrary why bother? Everything is still a sword.

    Mayor League Gamers
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • What about broadswords? I often call "arming swords" broadswords instead

    genesisSOC
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • There's still oodles of speculation, but I'm beginning to think that bastard swords were used by those who preferred more utility in close combat. A medieval longsword might have advantage in reach, but can be more awkward than a bastard sword once you close to grappling range, and you can still have the long grip for the extra leverage. Sure, there might be some short knights whose sword was proportioned that way but it wouldn't account for its popularity. There are accounts of it being developed for a particular thrusting move, but it would likely leave you vulnerable.

    Modighen
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • and now I know what the difference between these swords is, thanks:)

    Przemek Matczak
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • tfw its legal to wield a longsword in the US but not in the UK.

    Kylis
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • Your shirt promotions are one of the few I actually watch completely. They're hilarious!

    Edit: I just had the most awesome idea. In about a decade or so, when I finally have my blacksmith career up and running, all of the historical youtubers and such should start a gofundme campaign to build…. You guessed it… A castle!! I think that eventually, especially considering the rate some of these youtube channels grow, we could amass that mass amount of money to fund the construction of such a thing.

    Christopher Croxton/Esquire
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • So Shad, where did the use of "Claymore" come into play when referring to Two-Handed Swords and which was the common sword that had this name (Warsword vs Greatsword essentially )

    Shiono_the_Shade
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • TELL ME WHERE TO BUY A PRACTICE SWORD WOODEN OR OTHERWISE. I'VE TRAWLED YOUR VIDEOS AND AM FLABBERGASTED YOU'VE NOT MADE THIS VIDEO YET, HENCE THE OBNOXIOUS UPPER-CASE EMPHASIS.

    Fuzzy Dunlop
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • In Poland we have only a hand and a half sword which includes both types 😛

    Łukasz Żmuda-Trzebiatowski
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • Thankfully in the United States there is no law governing the wearing or use of a sword. Unless we take into account assault and battery laws. But nothing against self defense, as far as I'm aware.

    Gray Blackhelm
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • Analogy: todays Dreadnoughts are tomorrows battle cruisers

    Evan-Hunter Barnes
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • i imagine 'bastard' swords are called that because they dont really belong to either the onehanded or twohanded sword 'family'

    The Goddamn Batman
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • Thank you for teaching me that swords are genderfluid

    Kieran Culliton
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • And what about the Zweihänder?

    Pied Piper's Pestilence
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • I love this guy's energy!

    Jacob Cohen
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • …there's actually no legal problem in most of the United States carrying a sword openly, strangely enough. You're likely to agitate some folks and you're likely to speak with police officers who may or may not be as versed in the law as you'd hope, but it's often legal nonetheless.

    Somewhat more's the pity. Some brigand comes upon you in a cool night and demands your wallet and you draw your LONGSWORD! and … they're likely to decide they have somewhere else to be and their top priority has suddenly become getting there as quickly as possible. Because you have a LONGSWORD! and they weren't expecting that…

    Inareth
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • Regarding the German "Lang Schwert", I think it's interesting to look at the fight-book by Andre Paurñfeyndt in which he writes:
    "… the long sword, which is used with both hands, such as the battle sword, riding sword, estoc, and many others".

    Note: battle sword (Schlachtschwert) is what is what they called greatswords in German at the time.

    So it seems that "Lang Schwert" meant any type of two-handed sword.

    Tananjoh
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • I wonder from where you get the notion that longsword was in period for what we now called rapier and rapier referred to sidesword? George Silver and Joseph Swetnam both wrote "long sword or long rapier", indicating that these are similar swords but doesn't explain the difference. Swetnam also mention the "long sword" being used with a dagger, so it referred to a one-handed sword. Silver also seems to use "long sword" in opposition to the "short sword", the latter which seems to be synonymous with (or the term included) the basket-hilted backsword.

    I've seen people suggest that "long sword" in this period could mean longer sword regardless of it being one- or two-handed. I don't know if this is true, but it would fit with Swetnam's statement that:
    "The Bastard Sword, the which Sword is some-thing shorter then a long Sword, and yet longer then a Short-sword"

    Tananjoh
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • Im sorry, but I'm from Texas, and in 1 month we can open carry longswords, spears, katanas fuckin anything.

    (not even joking look up "open carry texas blades")

    Regular Dean
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • Where does the Claymore fit in all of this?

    Direbear Coat
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • Ok then, what is the Standard International unit of measurement for a Broadsword. PS its still 2017.

    ringspanner
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • I sexually identify as a bohemian flamberge.

    EL FLACO
    Posted February 14, 2020
  • I think we should start using the terms Shad Type I through Shad Type V.

    Russ Epp-Leppel
    Posted February 14, 2020

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